Bundesagentur für Arbeit

01.09.2014

Labour market opened up for more skilled workers

Starting immediately, additional skilled workers from third countries (i.e. non-EU or EEA countries) are offered the opportunity to migrate to Germany to work. The Federal Employment Agency (Bundesagentur für Arbeit – BA) has updated the positive list for skilled workers on 26 August 2014 following a new analysis of bottleneck occupations.

The positive list contains non-academic training occupations that suffer from a shortage of skilled professionals in Germany. Since the amendment of the Employment Ordinance on 1 July 2013, skilled professionals with a non-academic vocational training certificate have the opportunity to work in Germany if their occupation has been added to the positive list.

According to the Employment Ordinance (§ 6 para 2 clause 1 no. 2), occupations are selected for the positive list following a bottleneck analysis if no other access to the labour market, such as the EU Blue Card for academics, exists for those occupations.

Occupations in electrical engineering and technical railway operation and master craftsmen occupations in the fields of orthopaedics, rehabilitation technology and hearing aid acoustics have been added to the updated positive list. The following occupations, among others, have been added to the positive list:

  • Technical engineer – Electrical engineering (no specialization)
  • Industrial master craftsman – Electrical engineering
  • Information technology master craftsman
  • Construction building foreman
  • Installation and heating systems building master craftsman
  • Cooling systems building master craftsman
  • Tinsmith master craftsman
  • Hearing aid acoustics master craftsman
  • Orthopaedic technology master craftsman

Here you can find the current white list  (PDF, 438 KB).

The prerequisite for starting work in Germany is a successfully completed recognition procedure which establishes the equivalence of a foreign vocational training with the corresponding training in Germany.